Dental Clinic

Poor dental hygiene results in a build up of plaque and tartar on your pet's teeth. Plaque and tartar can lead to gingivitis and if left untreated can result in tooth decay but more importantly can have an effect on kidney, liver and heart function.
There are plenty of different ways to prevent or reduce the incidence of poor oral health.
Once the build up of plaque has become too great, then your pet will need to have an anaesthetic to have his teeth descaled. We would normally recommend that your pet has a blood test to check the function of the liver and kidneys, prior to the anaesthetic.
Your pet will need to spend at least a day at the surgery. He or she will be given a pre-med (a combination of a tranquiliser and an opiate painkiller) prior to the surgery. If your pet is very old or suffers with any pre-existing liver, kidney or heart problems we would also put your pet on an intravenous drip. A full general anaesthetic is then given so the procedure can be carried out.
An ultrasonic scaler is used to remove the plaque on your pet's teeth. Once the plaque has been removed it is possible to properly examine every aspect of the tooth and check for lesions, loose or broken teeth. It is at this time that some teeth may need to be removed. Once this has been completed the teeth are polished to smooth out and protect the surface of the enamel. Antibiotics and painkillers are given routinely and we recommend that your pet receives antibiotics prior to and after the dentistry.

Poor dental hygiene results in a build up of plaque and tartar on your pet's teeth. Plaque and tartar can lead to gingivitis and if left untreated can result in tooth decay but more importantly can have an effect on kidney, liver and heart function.
There are plenty of different ways to prevent or reduce the incidence of poor oral health.
Once the build up of plaque has become too great, then your pet will need to have an anaesthetic to have his teeth descaled. We would normally recommend that your pet has a blood test to check the function of the liver and kidneys, prior to the anaesthetic.
Your pet will need to spend at least a day at the surgery. He or she will be given a pre-med (a combination of a tranquiliser and an opiate painkiller) prior to the surgery. If your pet is very old or suffers with any pre-existing liver, kidney or heart problems we would also put your pet on an intravenous drip. A full general anaesthetic is then given so the procedure can be carried out.
An ultrasonic scaler is used to remove the plaque on your pet's teeth. Once the plaque has been removed it is possible to properly examine every aspect of the tooth and check for lesions, loose or broken teeth. It is at this time that some teeth may need to be removed. Once this has been completed the teeth are polished to smooth out and protect the surface of the enamel. Antibiotics and painkillers are given routinely and we recommend that your pet receives antibiotics prior to and after the dentistry.

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Ballyclare Hospital
75 Ballynure Road
Ballyclare
BT39 9AG
028 9332 2223

Abbey Clinic
163 Doagh Road
Whiteabbey
BT36 6AA
028 9036 5573
Cavehill Clinic
136 Cavehill Road
Belfast
BT15 5BU
028 9071 8134

Carrick Clinic
Unit 1 Victoria Road,
Shopping Centre,
Carrickfergus, 
BT38 7JE



                                                   

Ballyclare Hospital
75 Ballynure Road
Ballyclare
BT39 9AG
028 9332 2223

Abbey Clinic
163 Doagh Road
Whiteabbey
BT36 6AA
028 9036 5573
Cavehill Clinic
136 Cavehill Road
Belfast
BT15 5BU
028 9071 8134

Carrick Clinic
Unit 1 Victoria Road,
Shopping Centre,
Carrickfergus, 
BT38 7JE