PETS Travel Scheme

PETS Travel Scheme enables you to avoid putting your cat or dog into quarantine when you travel to certain countries (most countries in Western Europe & Scandinavia), enabling you to take your pet with you on holidays. To qualify for exemption from quarantine, you must meet various conditions relating to your pet’s health.

The conditions are set out in brief below. We strongly recommend visiting the government website for the latest and full information a long time (9 months) in advance of your travel date.

To get a 'pet passport' your pet must:

• be fitted with a microchip by your vet
• be vaccinated against rabies
• be blood tested to ensure that the vaccination is viable (30days post vaccine)
• get a PETS certificate from an authorised vet

Once your pet has a PETS certificate, it can enter back into the UK providing:

• that six months has passed from the date that the successful blood test was sampled.
• your pet has been treated against ticks and a tapeworm between 24 - 48 hours before it is checked in for the return journey to the UK
• your pet has not been outside any of the PETS qualifying countries in the six months before it enters the UK
• your pet is travelling on an authorised route with an approved transport company

Other considerations

• The PETS passport has an expiry date, which is linked to its rabies booster vaccination. It is important that your pet has a rabies booster vaccination before or on the date of passport expiry. Should this be delayed even by one day the process of revaccination and blood sampling will be required. A new PETS passport will be issued every time your pet has a rabies booster vaccination.
• take your pet for a health check by your vet in advance of your journey. Get advice from your vet on pregnant animals.
• speak to the carrier in advance to ascertain the conditions that your pet will travel in and to ensure that you have the required paperwork.
• do not use sedatives unless advised by a vet.
• give your pet only a light meal about 2 hours before travel.
• check with the carrier that your pet will have full and constant access to fresh water.
• use a container which enables your pet to stand, sit and lie down in a natural position, and to turn around easily. The container should contain absorbent bedding and provide ample ventilation. A familiar toy can help your pet get used to the container.
• ensure that your pet will not be exposed to extreme temperatures.
• try and match your pets sleeping patterns by travelling overnight where possible

Animal diseases which also affect human health

There are four main exotic diseases related to animals travelling to Europe which affect animal and human health.
 
1. Leishmaniasis -       Spread by sandflies
                                         Present in Europe, Middle East and many tropical countries
                                         Organism can cause disease in humans.

2. Babesiosis  -            Disease of cattle and other mammals
                                         Transmitted by ticks
                                         Present worldwide, including in some areas of UK and mainland Europe, and particularly in southern France.

3. Heartworm -              Adult worms live in the heart and blood vessels.
                                         Dogs most commonly infected – but cats and ferrets can
                                         Transmitted by mosquitoes
                                         Mainly in hot countries – including France and Spain
                                              
4. Ehrlichiosis -             Affects dogs, horses and people
                       

PETS Travel Scheme enables you to avoid putting your cat or dog into quarantine when you travel to certain countries (most countries in Western Europe & Scandinavia), enabling you to take your pet with you on holidays. To qualify for exemption from quarantine, you must meet various conditions relating to your pet’s health.

The conditions are set out in brief below. We strongly recommend visiting the government website for the latest and full information a long time (9 months) in advance of your travel date.

To get a 'pet passport' your pet must:

• be fitted with a microchip by your vet
• be vaccinated against rabies
• be blood tested to ensure that the vaccination is viable (30days post vaccine)
• get a PETS certificate from an authorised vet

Once your pet has a PETS certificate, it can enter back into the UK providing:

• that six months has passed from the date that the successful blood test was sampled.
• your pet has been treated against ticks and a tapeworm between 24 - 48 hours before it is checked in for the return journey to the UK
• your pet has not been outside any of the PETS qualifying countries in the six months before it enters the UK
• your pet is travelling on an authorised route with an approved transport company

Other considerations

• The PETS passport has an expiry date, which is linked to its rabies booster vaccination. It is important that your pet has a rabies booster vaccination before or on the date of passport expiry. Should this be delayed even by one day the process of revaccination and blood sampling will be required. A new PETS passport will be issued every time your pet has a rabies booster vaccination.
• take your pet for a health check by your vet in advance of your journey. Get advice from your vet on pregnant animals.
• speak to the carrier in advance to ascertain the conditions that your pet will travel in and to ensure that you have the required paperwork.
• do not use sedatives unless advised by a vet.
• give your pet only a light meal about 2 hours before travel.
• check with the carrier that your pet will have full and constant access to fresh water.
• use a container which enables your pet to stand, sit and lie down in a natural position, and to turn around easily. The container should contain absorbent bedding and provide ample ventilation. A familiar toy can help your pet get used to the container.
• ensure that your pet will not be exposed to extreme temperatures.
• try and match your pets sleeping patterns by travelling overnight where possible

Animal diseases which also affect human health

There are four main exotic diseases related to animals travelling to Europe which affect animal and human health.
 
1. Leishmaniasis -       Spread by sandflies
                                         Present in Europe, Middle East and many tropical countries
                                         Organism can cause disease in humans.

2. Babesiosis  -            Disease of cattle and other mammals
                                         Transmitted by ticks
                                         Present worldwide, including in some areas of UK and mainland Europe, and particularly in southern France.

3. Heartworm -              Adult worms live in the heart and blood vessels.
                                         Dogs most commonly infected – but cats and ferrets can
                                         Transmitted by mosquitoes
                                         Mainly in hot countries – including France and Spain
                                              
4. Ehrlichiosis -             Affects dogs, horses and people
                       

  

  

 

  

  

 

  

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Ballyclare Hospital
75 Ballynure Road
Ballyclare
BT39 9AG
028 9332 2223

Abbey Clinic
163 Doagh Road
Whiteabbey
BT36 6AA
028 9036 5573
Cavehill Clinic
136 Cavehill Road
Belfast
BT15 5BU
028 9071 8134

Carrick Clinic
Unit 1 Victoria Road,
Shopping Centre,
Carrickfergus, 
BT38 7JE



                                                   

Ballyclare Hospital
75 Ballynure Road
Ballyclare
BT39 9AG
028 9332 2223

Abbey Clinic
163 Doagh Road
Whiteabbey
BT36 6AA
028 9036 5573
Cavehill Clinic
136 Cavehill Road
Belfast
BT15 5BU
028 9071 8134

Carrick Clinic
Unit 1 Victoria Road,
Shopping Centre,
Carrickfergus, 
BT38 7JE